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Nimue (Nimue)
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Username: Nimue

Post Number: 2964
Registered: 8-2001
Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 5:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

According to a recent TV crime show (although not "Law & Order") what should you be sure to say when a police officer tells you a loved one has been murdered & why?
Tsoram1970 (Tsoram1970)
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Username: Tsoram1970

Post Number: 1007
Registered: 6-2001
Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 6:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Scream and then faint?
Enjay (Enjay)
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Username: Enjay

Post Number: 945
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 7:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this advice so that the police don't think you murdered them? Does it involve finding out more information about the event, so that you won't look suspicious by knowing too much about it?
Is the thing you should say a question? Statement? Expression of shock at the murder of your loved one?
Alex319 (Alex319)
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Username: Alex319

Post Number: 558
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 8:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I assume that "a loved one" means someone that you love, correct?

By "sure to say" are you referring to something that is said to the police? To a judge or jury?

Is the purpose of the statement to...

...make the police more likely to be interested in your case?

...give the police information? that would help them solve the case? that would help them protect other potential victims?

...influence the outcome of a trial (directly or indirectly)? By providing an emotional appeal to the judge or jury? To avoid some kind of legal technicality that the murderer could get off on?

...Avoid casting suspicion on yourself? On someone close to you?

...To help the police get more information? like saying "it's okay for you to search my home for evidence" if you think there might be evidence there?

...To pressure the police in any way? Like "If you screw up this investigation, I'll make sure it's all over the newspapers?"

Would this advice be useful only for murder? Or could it also be used, say, if he was the victim of an aggravated assault?

Does the thing you're supposed to say concern yourself? the victim? The perpetrator? The time and place of the murder?

Would this work only if you said it immediately after being told about the loved one's death? Or would it work if you told them a few minutes after? a few hours after? a day after?

Is it a...

...request?
...instruction?
...exclamation?
...expression of an emotion other than shock?
Dlcygnet (Dlcygnet)
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Username: Dlcygnet

Post Number: 1183
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 11:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How?
Did he suffer?
Nimue (Nimue)
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Username: Nimue

Post Number: 2965
Registered: 8-2001
Posted on Friday, December 14, 2007 - 7:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tsoram1970 (Tsoram1970)
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Username: Tsoram1970

Post Number: 1007
Registered: 6-2001

Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 6:47 pm: Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)
Scream and then faint?
Enjay (Enjay)
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Username: Enjay

Post Number: 945
Registered: 4-2007

Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 7:12 pm: Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)
Is this advice so that the police don't think you murdered them?yes Does it involve finding out more information about the event yes, so that you won't look suspicious by knowing too much about it? yope
Is the thing you should say a questionb{ yes} Statement? no Expression of shock at the murder of your loved one? no
Alex319 (Alex319)
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Username: Alex319

Post Number: 558
Registered: 5-2007

Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 8:27 pm: Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)
I assume that "a loved one" means someone that you love, correct? well, im this context, it means a memberr of your nuclear family (regardless of whetrher you loved him)

By "sure to say" are you referring to something that is said to the police? yes To a judge or jury? no

Is the purpose of the statement to...

...make the police more likely to be interested in your case? no

...give the police information? no that would help them solve the case? no that would help them protect other potential victims? no

...influence the outcome of a trial (directly or indirectly)? noBy providing an emotional appeal to the judge or jury? no To avoid some kind of legal technicality that the murderer could get off on? no

...Avoid casting suspicion on yourself? yes On someone close to you? no

...To help the police get more information? nolike saying "it's okay for you to search my home for evidence" if you think there might be evidence there? no

...To pressure the police in any way? Like "If you screw up this investigation, I'll make sure it's all over the newspapers?" no

Would this advice be useful only for murder? noish Or could it also be used, say, if he was the victim of an aggravated assault? yesish

Does the thing you're supposed to say concern yourself? no the victim? yesThe perpetrator? no The time and place of the murder? no

Would this work only if you said it immediately after being told about the loved one's death? this pould work best Or would it work if you told them a few minutes after? as would this a few hours after? maybe a day after? no

Is it a...

...request? no
...instruction? no
...exclamation? no
...expression of an emotion other than shock? no
Dlcygnet (Dlcygnet)
New member
Username: Dlcygnet

Post Number: 1183
Registered: 6-2005

Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 11:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)
How? yes
Did he suffer? no


******** SPOILER ************
According to a tecent episode of "Without a Trace" (a weaker show than "Law & Order," by the way), if you don't ask "How?" upon being told a family member was murdered, the police will infer that you already know. . .because you did it. I think that's silly--I'm so squeamish I don't watch my own blood being drawn; so I certainly wouldn't want to know how a loved one was murdered. I knew it would be easy (although not THIS easy), but I figured it would be interesting anyway. Please check out my new, harder puzzle.
Dlcygnet (Dlcygnet)
New member
Username: Dlcygnet

Post Number: 1185
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Sunday, December 16, 2007 - 6:09 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I simply posed myself the question. And asked the first things that I would ask. Obviously I'm not planning on murdering anybody. Who are you planning to murder, Nim? CONFESS!!! Or better yet, create a lateral puzzle on the person you murdered. No jury OF YOUR PEERS will convict you anywhere.
Beccaann (Beccaann)
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Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1997
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2007 - 7:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The other give-away according to crime shows I've watched is referring to the recently deceased loved one in the past tense, showing that its already sunk in that the person is dead. Usually, when just finding out that someone dear has been killed, a person would not yet think of them as dead.
Nimue (Nimue)
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Username: Nimue

Post Number: 2974
Registered: 8-2001
Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2007 - 8:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good point, Beccann. That was certainly true of me when my father died (of natural causes).

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