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Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 8:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like to read murder mysteries &, as puzzle regulars know, I also like to watch "Law & Order." I like these things for various reasons, one of which I used to think was rather unusual. That reason turns out to be so common that it was mentioned in an essay on why people like crime fiction. What is it??
Lynne (Lynne)
Posted on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 9:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it so that she can understand her own psyche and the possibility of turning to crime, and by understanding human nature she can recognise symptons early and prevent being a murderer?
Ian (Image)
Posted on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 9:20 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So you can figure out, should you ever need to, how to commit the perfect crime?
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 10:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Lynne (Lynne) on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 09:11 pm:

Is it so that she can understand her own psyche and the possibility of turning to crime, and by understanding human nature she can recognise symptons early and prevent being a murderer? No. A saint I ain't but I've never been afraid that I mihght become a murderer

By Ian (Image) on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 09:20 pm:

So you can figure out, should you ever need to, how to commit the perfect crime? no. See above
Kristoffer Dominique Albeus (Kristoffer)
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 3:16 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

for your benefit?
for the benefit of others?
Tim A. Dowd (Bodo)
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 3:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

They like to solve puzzles? It makes them feel smart when they get the answer before the end? They don't like butlers?
John Morahan (Wunderland)
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 8:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anything to do with your own writing?
Finding out how to avoid being murdered?
John Faben (Bentarm)
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 2:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could you enjoy 'true crime' stories for the same reason? Do you?
Would this only apply to 'traditional' murder mysteries, of the whodunnit sort (of which the Silver Blaze Sherlock Holmes story is just about the best example I can think of)? Or might you like, say, Columbo (where we know whodunnit, and spend all the show trying to figure out how to prove it) for the same reason?
Are there any other genres of fiction you might like for the same reason? historical fiction? romances? science fiction?
Mayank Kumar (Mayankk)
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 12:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You like to connect the psychological knowledge gained from murder mysteries to the incidents happening around you, like say trying to find similar connections.
Drew Sollenberger (Sollen)
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 8:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

because you like to see the 'lateral thinking' put into the crimes? like ohh you were smart to have so and so handle you gum first so there were others prints on the murder weapon
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Wednesday, February 08, 2006 - 10:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Kristoffer Dominique Albeus (Kristoffer) on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 03:16 am:

for your benefit? yes
for the benefit of others? no

By Tim A. Dowd (Bodo) on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 03:41 pm:

They like to solve puzzles? no It makes them feel smart when they get the answer before the end? no They don't like butlers? Nooooooo

By John Morahan (Wunderland) on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 08:35 pm:

Anything to do with your own writing? no
Finding out how to avoid being murdered? well, I have lots of professional enemies, but I never exactly thought any of them were exactly likely to murder me

By John Faben (Bentarm) on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 02:12 am:

Could you enjoy 'true crime' stories for the same reason? yes Do you?No, for the irrelevant reason that they're usually less interesting than fictional ones
Would this only apply to 'traditional' murder mysteries, of the whodunnit sort (of which the Silver Blaze Sherlock Holmes story is just about the best example I can think of)? no Or might you like, say, Columbo (where we know whodunnit, and spend all the show trying to figure out how to prove it) for the same reason? yes
Are there any other genres of fiction you might like for the same reason? in principle, yes, historical fiction? no romances? no science fiction? no. None of those would work even in principle as a genre, but some instances of each might work

By Mayank Kumar (Mayankk) on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 12:56 pm:

You like to connect the psychological knowledge gained from murder mysteries to the incidents happening around you, like say trying to find similar connections. no

By Drew Sollenberger (Sollen) on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 08:57 pm:

because you like to see the 'lateral thinking' put into the crimes? no like ohh you were smart to have so and so handle you gum first so there were others prints on the murder weapon no
John Faben (Bentarm)
Posted on Thursday, February 09, 2006 - 1:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

because they give you ideas for lateral puzzles?
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Friday, February 10, 2006 - 11:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By John Faben (Bentarm) on Thursday, February 09, 2006 - 01:55 pm:

because they give you ideas for lateral puzzles? no, although they do. But I had this motive long before I knew about lateral puzzles.

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Drew Sollenberger (Sollen)
Posted on Sunday, February 12, 2006 - 3:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is your reason for watching it an 'intelectual' one? enjoying some intelectual challene posed?

do you like to see the bad guys get punished?

is the fact that they are *murder* mysteries important? would a story about trying to find someone who stole a precious artifact work as well? or do you have some fasination with blood and guts?

would the Sherlock Holmes/Monk style of myestry (where you have one 'super detective' figuring out elaboratly complecated casses from deduction) be of more interesting? Would you enjoy the more mundane law and order type of mystery when most of the time is spent jumping around between people asking questions but with less of the deductions from little seen facts? would they both work equally as well?
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 4:46 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Drew Sollenberger (Sollen) on Sunday, February 12, 2006 - 03:26 pm:

is your reason for watching it an 'intelectual' one? no enjoying some intelectual challene posed? no

do you like to see the bad guys get punished? irrel

is the fact that they are *murder* mysteries important? yes would a story about trying to find someone who stole a precious artifact work as well?it would work but not as well or do you have some fasination with blood and guts? no--I'm very squeaminsh

would the Sherlock Holmes/Monk style of myestry (where you have one 'super detective' figuring out elaboratly complecated casses from deduction) be of more interesting? irrel Would you enjoy the more mundane law and order type of mystery when most of the time is spent jumping around between people asking questions but with less of the deductions from little seen facts? yes would they both work equally as well? yes
Tim A. Dowd (Bodo)
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 7:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it that you enjoy seeing people do quality work? You like a good story? You like seeing justice done? It makes you feel safer knowing criminals are getting caught and/or removed from society (even when said criminals are fictional)?
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 11:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Tim A. Dowd (Bodo) on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 07:50 pm:

Is it that you enjoy seeing people do quality work?irrel You like a good story? irrel You like seeing justice done? irrel It makes you feel safer knowing criminals are getting caught and/or removed from society (even when said criminals are fictional)? irrel

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Tim A. Dowd (Bodo)
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 9:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BTW: I would recommend Lee Child and Harlan Coben, if you haven't already tried them.

The reason you watch them is because they make you feel a certain thing? Or a certain way? Would it work if the detectives/sleuths were not successful?
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 9:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Tim A. Dowd (Bodo) on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 09:38 pm:

BTW: I would recommend Lee Child and Harlan Coben, if you haven't already tried them. I haven't but will!!

The reason you watch them is because they make you feel a certain thing? yes Or a certain way? yes Would it work if the detectives/sleuths were not successful? yes
Mosquito (Mosquito)
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 1:16 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One of the things people like about murder mysteries is that they feel that they can recognise the "mistake" the victim made, and feel safer because they know that they will not make that mistake. Is this relevant? ( I realise that it's probably not, because this reason's pervasiveness would be obvious; but maybe there is something tangentially relevant in the idea?)
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 6:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Mosquito (Mosquito) on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 01:16 am:

One of the things people like about murder mysteries is that they feel that they can recognise the "mistake" the victim made, and feel safer because they know that they will not make that mistake. Is this relevant? no ( I realise that it's probably not, because this reason's pervasiveness would be obvious; but maybe there is something tangentially relevant in the idea?) no
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Thursday, February 23, 2006 - 9:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HINT: Think about the characteristics of murderers
Tim A. Dowd (Bodo)
Posted on Friday, February 24, 2006 - 3:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, they kill people, don't they--let's see, they don't value the lives of others? They don't value life in general? Does it make you feel superior? Grateful that you don't share those characteristics? Dehumanization relevant?
Felicia Nimue Ackerman (Nimue)
Posted on Friday, February 24, 2006 - 6:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Tim A. Dowd (Bodo) on Friday, February 24, 2006 - 03:15 pm:

Well, they kill people, don't they--let's see, they don't value the lives of others? yes They don't value life in general? yes Does it make you feel superior? yesGrateful that you don't share those characteristics? yes Dehumanization relevant? huh?

********** Spoiler ************** I like to read murder mysteries because they make me think, "A saint I ain't but at least I'm not a murderer." I used to think this was an unusual reason, but apparently it's common. But this was a bad puzzle--too hard without hints & too easy with it. Look at the bottom of thwe page for a better one--I hope

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