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Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 151
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 6:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

four letters + one letter = the opposite!

(have fun)
Alhucema (Alhucema)
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Post Number: 1383
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Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 7:29 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the word a noun? adjective? verb? adverb?
Markobr (Markobr)
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Post Number: 485
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Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 9:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The four letters form a word ("the first word")? A four letter word? And you can add one letter to the word so you get another word ("the second word") which is the opposite of the first word? Do you add the letter to the end of the first word?

Does the first word contain any two identical letters? The second word?

Is the first word standard English? The second word?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 152
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 9:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the word a noun?(-this adjective? verb? adverb?

The four letters form a word ("the first word")?yes A four letter word?yes And you can add one letter to the word so you get another word ("the second word") which is the opposite of the first word?yes, yes Do you add the letter to the end of the first word? no

Does the first word contain any two identical letters?yes The second word?yes

Is the first word standard English? The second word?both
Alhucema (Alhucema)
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Post Number: 1384
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Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 9:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the added letter i? a?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 155
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Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 9:42 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the added letter i? a?no to both
Alhucema (Alhucema)
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Post Number: 1385
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Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 9:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does the first word denote a thing? an activity?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 156
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 10:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does the first word denote a thing? an activity?no to both
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 2:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would it be cheating to just demand LTPF lists of letters?

Does the word change tense when a letter is added?

Is the first word a verb? A noun? An adjective?

Is the second word a verb? A noun? An adjective?
Yojimbo (Yojimbo)
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Post Number: 11
Registered: 11-2009
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 6:36 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is the first word a proper noun?
is the second word a proper noun?
is the added letter a vowel?
I assume "letter" means letters from the alphabet, and not a bit of correspondence. Correct?
Noobdogg (Noobdogg)
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Post Number: 206
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 6:36 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Title fixed.
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 10:20 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could this puzzle be summed up as follows :

There is a four letter word that when you add another letter to it you arrive at a word that means the opposite of the original 4 letter one?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 158
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 5:42 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would it be cheating to just demand LTPF lists of letters? acually it would give it away...

Does the word change tense when a letter is added? no

Is the first word a verb? A noun?(-this An adjective?

Is the second word a verb? A noun?(-this An adjective?

Title fixed. thank you i had forgotten...

Could this puzzle be summed up as follows :

There is a four letter word that when you add another letter to it you arrive at a word that means the opposite of the original 4 letter one? CORRECT...
Quovynyte (Quovynyte)
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Username: Quovynyte

Post Number: 445
Registered: 6-2009
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 5:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the extra letter added at the beginning? In the middle?
Is there a straightforward answer?
Eg. Princes + s = Princess
Or is it more lateral?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 159
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 5:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the extra letter added at the beginning?(-this In the middle?
Is there a straightforward answer? yes
Eg. Princes + s = Princess
Or is it more lateral?yes
Quovynyte (Quovynyte)
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Post Number: 447
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Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 6:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could both words be used in the following contexts:
I smelled the {noun}.
I plugged in/put a battery in the {noun}.
The {noun} jumped on me.
The {noun} did something to me.
I ate the {noun}.
I saw the {noun}.
I heard the {noun}.
I felt the {noun}.
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 161
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 6:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could both words be used in the following contexts:
I smelled the {noun}.
I plugged in/put a battery in the {noun}. (-both could be used in this context, but not as a specific noun...
The {noun} jumped on me.
The {noun} did something to me.
I ate the {noun}.
I saw the {noun}.
I heard the {noun}.
I felt the {noun}.
Biograd (Biograd)
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Post Number: 465
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Posted on Saturday, November 07, 2009 - 1:16 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are both words in English? both in the same other language? in different, other languages? one in English and one not?

Also, I don't exactly know what you mean about "specific" noun. Do you mean the nouns are abstract concepts? that they are names of a class of related things?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Posted on Saturday, November 07, 2009 - 2:19 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is either noun powered by electricity? Both?
Yojimbo (Yojimbo)
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Posted on Saturday, November 07, 2009 - 5:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

does the second noun have more vowels than the first?
is the added letter a consonant?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 168
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Posted on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 6:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are both words in English?yes both in the same other language? in different, other languages? one in English and one not? see above

Also, I don't exactly know what you mean about "specific" noun. Do you mean the nouns are abstract concepts?(-this that they are names of a class of related things?

Is either noun powered by electricity?see above Both?

does the second noun have more vowels than the first? no
is the added letter a consonant?yes
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 187
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Posted on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 11:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

*correction* Do you mean the nouns are abstract concepts?no
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 188
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Posted on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 11:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

both words are words that direct to a general area or item.
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 189
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Posted on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 11:29 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

my appologies i am no good at english, both words are most commonly used as an ADVERB... but they can be used as a noun.
my bad...
Biograd (Biograd)
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Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 1:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So are they opposites when used as adverbs? as nouns? both?
Quovynyte (Quovynyte)
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Post Number: 496
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Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 5:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Guess = Well?
Does the word as an adverb end in "ly"?
Tommyp (Tommyp)
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Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 12:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are the two identical letters adjacent? at the end of the word?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 194
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Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 6:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So are they opposites when used as adverbs?most commonly as nouns?less but yes

Guess = Well? ???????????????
Does the word as an adverb end in "ly"?No

Are the two identical letters adjacent?no at the end of the word?and No
Biograd (Biograd)
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Post Number: 477
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Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 8:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think we are misunderstanding each other here. I understood your previous responses as indicating that there are two senses of each word, one in which each functions as an adverb and the other in which each functions as a noun.

For example, in Quovynyte's example of the word "well", it can function as an adverb ("We did the job WELL") or as a noun ("I threw the coin into the WELL for good luck"). In the first sense, the opposite would be something like "poorly". In the noun sense of a water-filled hole, there is really no opposite for the word "well".

So both words are commonly used as nouns, but are they opposites in this sense? They are less commonly used as nouns, but do they remain opposites when used in this sense? Or are we totally on the wrong track in assuming these are actual antonyms?
Biograd (Biograd)
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Post Number: 478
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Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 8:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry, in the last paragraph I should have started with "So both words are commonly used as adverbs, but are they opposites in this sense?
Biograd (Biograd)
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Post Number: 479
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Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 8:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry, in the last paragraph I should have started with "So both words are commonly used as adverbs, but are they opposites in this sense?"
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Post Number: 196
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Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 9:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think we are misunderstanding each other here. I understood your previous responses as indicating that there are two senses of each word, one in which each functions as an adverb and the other in which each functions as a noun.

For example, in Quovynyte's example of the word "well", it can function as an adverb ("We did the job WELL") or as a noun ("I threw the coin into the WELL for good luck"). In the first sense, the opposite would be something like "poorly". In the noun sense of a water-filled hole, there is really no opposite for the word "well". oh sorry, that makes sense...

So both words are commonly used as adverbs, but are they opposites in this sense?(-this/not this-) They are less commonly used as nouns, but do they remain opposites when used in this sense? Or are we totally on the wrong track in assuming these are actual antonyms?you are on the right track!!!
Quovynyte (Quovynyte)
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Posted on Saturday, November 14, 2009 - 7:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So both words are commonly used as adverbs, but are they opposites in this sense?
Are their noun meaning aren't relevant at all?
Which type of adverb was the first word?
Adverbs of Manner? Ex. Mary eats sandwiches very carefully.
Adverbs of Time? Ex. She's going to eat ham 'n' cheese next week.
Adverbs of Comment: Ex. Unfortunately, she ran out of bread yesterday.
Adverbs of Frequency? Ex. She usually puts mayonnaise on her salad sandwiches.
Adverbs of Degree? Ex. She likes toasties a lot.
What about the second adverb?
Quovynyte (Quovynyte)
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Posted on Saturday, November 14, 2009 - 7:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was one of the adverbs:
Bad? Fast? Late? Much? Loud? Little? Straight? Far? Near? High? Low? Wide? first? Long?
Did it end in -ically?
Oh and I forgot:
Adverbs of Location? Ex. She placed the butter far away from the lettuce.
Probably_monty_hall (Probably_monty_hall)
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Posted on Monday, November 16, 2009 - 3:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Clearly these aren't English words, but I can't help but think of "este" and "oeste". Are these at all OTRT?
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Posted on Monday, November 16, 2009 - 6:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So both words are commonly used as adverbs, but are they opposites in this sense? yes
Are their noun meaning aren't relevant at all? not really
Which type of adverb was the first word? it shows direction to an area of space
Adverbs of Manner? Ex. Mary eats sandwiches very carefully.
Adverbs of Time? Ex. She's going to eat ham 'n' cheese next week.
Adverbs of Comment: Ex. Unfortunately, she ran out of bread yesterday.
Adverbs of Frequency? Ex. She usually puts mayonnaise on her salad sandwiches.
Adverbs of Degree? Ex. She likes toasties a lot.
What about the second adverb?same, it shows a direction to an area of space
Was one of the adverbs:
Bad? Fast? Late? Much? Loud? Little? Straight? Far? Near? High? Low? Wide? first? Long? no
Did it end in -ically? no
Oh and I forgot:
Adverbs of Location? Ex. She placed the butter far away from the lettuce.(-this is much closer
Clearly these aren't English words, but I can't help but think of "este" and "oeste". Are these at all OTRT?they are english, american english, and OTRT???
Probably_monty_hall (Probably_monty_hall)
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Posted on Monday, November 16, 2009 - 10:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"here" and "there"? or "where"?
Quovynyte (Quovynyte)
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Posted on Monday, November 16, 2009 - 10:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Near? Far? Beside? Away? Towards? Behind? Front? Across? Through? In? On? Around? To?
Biograd (Biograd)
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Posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 1:55 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh, I think Probably_monty_hall got it with one of those!
Fleemco198 (Fleemco198)
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Posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 5:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"here" and "there"?


*$poiler************
you take the adverb HERE and add the letter T and you get the opposite THERE!!!!!!!!!!!!

awesome job probably_monty_hall!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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