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Lateral Puzzles » Solved Lateral Thinking Puzzles » Solved Puzzles - June 2005 » [Grainbeer] Destiny´s children » Archive through May 21, 2005 « Previous Next »

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Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 3:25 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The lives of those who aided them were not spared. However, some of those who failed to aid them, saved their lives
Benjamin Moore (Zenith)
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 8:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Saved their own lives, or the lives of the 'them' originally stated?
Tony (E20)
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 9:56 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

True story?

Which of the following statements are correct?
Group A aided Group B.
Group A lost their lives.
Group C failed to aid Group D.
Some of Group C's lives were saved.
Some of Group D's lives were saved.

Are Group B and Group D the same?

Did all of Group A lose their lives? As a direct consequence of trying to aid Group B?

How many in each group? Are all members of the groups human? adult?
Sudesh Kumar (Sudesh)
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 10:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

They who aided them originally did so because they wanted to?

those who failed to aid them wanted to aid them but failed?

those who failed to aid them did so intentionally?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 11:09 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Benjamin:
Saved their own lives, or the lives of the 'them' originally stated? Saved the lives of 'them', not their own

Tony:
True story? Yes

Which of the following statements are correct?
Group A aided Group B. correct
Group A lost their lives. correct
Group C failed to aid Group D. correct. just to make it not too confusing, group D = group B

Sudesh:
They who aided them originally did so because they wanted to? No

those who failed to aid them wanted to aid them but failed? No

those who failed to aid them did so intentionally? No

Some of Group C's lives were saved. Yes. At least, I think so...
Some of Group D's lives were saved. Irrelevant. But yes, some of the lives of this group were saved

Are Group B and Group D the same? yes, as stated above

Did all of Group A lose their lives? Nearly all, probably. I do not know the exact details of this incident As a direct consequence of trying to aid Group B? No. They did not try to aid them intentionally

How many in each group? I don´t know. My guess is around 100 - 200 in group A, and 1000- 2000 in group B. But this is mid between a wild guess and a calculated guess Are all members of the groups human? No adult? Yes
Tony (E20)
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 9:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are any of the members of the any of the groups human?

Are all groups of the same species? Mammals? Insects? Birds? Reptiles? Amphibians? Extra-terrestrials? Fish?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 9:13 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are any of the members of the any of the groups human? yes

Are all groups of the same species? no -
and of those not human:


Mammals? Insects? Birds? yes Reptiles? Amphibians? Extra-terrestrials? Fish? and no to the rest
Tony (E20)
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 11:59 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Group A: birds? human? other?

Group B: birds? human? other?

Group C: birds? human? other?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 3:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Group A: birds? human? other? birds

Group B: birds? human? other? human

Group C: birds? human? other? birds
Mosquito (Mosquito)
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 8:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did the humans eat any of the birds?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Thursday, May 19, 2005 - 12:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did the humans eat any of the birds? yes
Tony (E20)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 1:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So, about 150 birds aided about 1500 humans, and lost their lives. Did the humans kill them? and eat them? Was it the being eaten that provided the aid? Did the birds do something else to aid the humans?

Another group of birds (how many in this group?) did not aid the same group of humans, but some of these birds were spared.

Were both bird groups the same species? Wild birds? sea birds? poultry? fowl? game birds? canaries?

Did these events happen within the last year? decade? century? millenium?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 2:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So, about 150 birds aided about 1500 humans, and lost their lives. Did the humans kill them? Yes and eat them? Yes Was it the being eaten that provided the aid? No Did the birds do something else to aid the humans? Yes

Another group of birds (how many in this group?) I don´t know the exact figure here either. But my guess would be maybe 50 did not aid the same group of humans, but some of these birds were spared. Yes - they did not aid that group of humans, and yes, some of the lives of these birds were (probably) spared

Were both bird groups the same species? Yes Wild birds? sea birds? poultry? fowl? game birds? canaries? Domestic birds, but none of these

Did these events happen within the last year? decade? century? this is it millenium?
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 2:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Homing pigeons? Carrier pigeons?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 5:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Homing pigeons? No Carrier pigeons? No

This sparked my interest in the culinary of pigeons, by the way. Wild pigeons are quite tasty. And no one I know would want to eat pigeons living in the city because of all unhealthy food they are thought to consume. But what about carrier pigeons? Since they are being trained for racing, they probably are very skinny. Not much meat there, is my guess. Anyone who can enlighten me on this?
Barbara Johannessen Bailey (Rabrab)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 6:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most food pigeons are sold as squabs (young birds) There's not much meat on any pigeon (or dove, for that matter), it's pretty much the breast meat and that's it. Carrier pigeons would have large, strong breast muscles, since that's where half of the wing muscles are anchored, but they'd also tend to the tough end of the spectrum. I suppose that you could eat carrier pigeon, but it wouldn't be a first choice.

Domestic birds commonly kept as pets?
Parrots? budgies? swans?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 6:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for broadening my pidgeonic knowledge base :)

Domestic birds commonly kept as pets? No
Parrots? budgies? swans? None of these
Barbara Johannessen Bailey (Rabrab)
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2005 - 7:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Domestic birds commonly kept as meat providers? as egg providers? as watch-birds? (geese or guineas?) Wild birds that are also widely farmed (like pheasant and quail?) peafowl?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Saturday, May 21, 2005 - 1:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Domestic birds commonly kept as meat providers? yes as egg providers? as watch-birds? (geese or guineas?) Wild birds that are also widely farmed (like pheasant and quail?) peafowl? no to the rest, as far as I know
Barbara Johannessen Bailey (Rabrab)
Posted on Saturday, May 21, 2005 - 2:08 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hmmm. You said not poultry or fowl?

Anyway,
turkeys?
geese?
ducks?
Einar Berg (Grainbeer)
Posted on Saturday, May 21, 2005 - 2:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hmmm. You said not poultry or fowl?

Anyway,
turkeys? Yes, turkeys
geese?
ducks?

Sorry, my English language ability may have some flaws. I thought 'poultry' only applied to chicken, and 'fowl' only applied to hunted wild birds ('game'). But I was probably wrong here... awfully sorry
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Saturday, May 21, 2005 - 3:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The word "poultry" does indeed come from "poule", the French word for a hen. The diminutive, "poulet", meant a chicken; the English word "pullet" is a technical term for a hen that has begun to lay eggs, but has not yet moulted.

A man who bred chickens was known as a "pouletier" in old French, and that became "poulter" in English. As other birds were bred for food, eggs, or feathers, the term "poulter" acquired a more general significance,

The word "fowl" comes from the German "Vogel", which simply means a bird; the terms "fowl" and "bird" are practically synonymous in English.

And don't worry, Grainbeer. Your English is not only fine, but a sight better than my Norwegian :)


Did the turkeys save the lives of these people by giving them some kind of warning? by providing them with food?