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Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do you think that the sound from the CD is a home recording?
Is it from something watery?
Do you think it is important for us to determine more precisely what the recording is?
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:52 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Mosquito (Mosquito) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 03:21 am:

Could you name the sheepdog Henri? He does not seem to respond to that name, but...

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:33 am:

If the sheepdog is French, that could solve our problem! ...he does, now you come to mention it, look rather like a Pyrenean sheepdog...
If he's not French, we could always call him "French Henri"! ...well, something along those lines might work. If only I knew a little more about French Pyrenean sheepdogs, but I was far too busy with the oriental rug-making badge as a lad :(

Please could you remove the battery from the Stereo Unit and inspect it? It looks like a standard lithium battery. It seems to have been made in Japan, and even if it had been made in France, three Henrys is an awful lot of inductance. But very good thinking :)
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:41 am:

Do you think that the sound from the CD is a home recording? Hard to tell - the quality of sound is OK
Is it from something watery? I would say so, yes
Do you think it is important for us to determine more precisely what the recording is? May come in useful later on, but I don't think it's going to help us at the present moment.
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 12:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recall that the weapon that the British used so successfully at Rorkes Drift was called the "MARTINI HENRY" Rifle.

I don't suppose by any stretch of the imagination that the Shotgun is named similarly?
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 12:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could you give the Chinese Restraunt a ring and see if they could drop off a menu?
If they do, could you invetsigate the menu for anything significant?
Do you think the Restraunt can assist us at the moment?

Can we safely assume that all we are looking for right now, is a third French Henri?
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 12:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have discovered that there are several shotguns called Henry and they may have been produced by James Purdey & Sons.

Here are two examples:

Henry Tolley 16Ga. Double Hammer Shotgun

Alexander Henry Cased Shotgun

Now I am hoping that the shotgun in our possession is one of these! (Maybe you need to re-assemble the weapon!)
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 7:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 12:19 pm:

I recall that the weapon that the British used so successfully at Rorkes Drift was called the "MARTINI HENRY" Rifle. Indeed. Martini was a Hungarian who lived and worked in Switzerland, Henry was a Scot. I suppose we could try claiming that France is between Switzerland and Scotland, so the gun must be French according to the law of averages, but I am not sure the doorkeeper would necessarily accept this.

I don't suppose by any stretch of the imagination that the Shotgun is named similarly? Purdey shotguns are simply called "Purdeys", not Martinis or Henrys or anything else.

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 12:28 pm:

Could you give the Chinese Restaurant a ring and see if they could drop off a menu? I have done so. One will be delivered shortly.
If they do, could you investigate the menu for anything significant? We will need to wait until it arrives.
Do you think the Restaurant can assist us at the moment? I doubt it, but one never can tell.

Can we safely assume that all we are looking for right now, is a third French Henri? Judging by the reaction of the doorkeeper to the two we have offered him so far, I should think that were we to find a third French Henri or Henry, this would indeed suffice.

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 12:44 pm:

I have discovered that there are several shotguns called Henry and they may have been produced by James Purdey & Sons They may have been, but...

Here are two examples:

Henry Tolley 16Ga. Double Hammer Shotgun ...Henry Tolley was a 19th century English gunsmith who worked in Birmingham, while...

Alexander Henry Cased Shotgun ...Alexander Henry was, as mentioned above, a Scottish gunsmith who worked in Edinburgh.

Now I am hoping that the shotgun in our possession is one of these! It isn't. It's a 12-bore side-by-side Purdey shotgun. It's as English as warm beer, pickled eggs and John Major's underpants. (Maybe you need to re-assemble the weapon!) Maybe I do, but I don't think it would help at the present time. I'd train your eagle eye on Pyrenean sheepdogs for the moment, if I were you...
John Morahan (Wunderland)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 7:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the dog male? or female?
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 7:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By John Morahan (Wunderland) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 07:53 pm:

Is the dog male? this one or female?
Hannah Kinghern (Kdoc)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 9:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It appears that a certain Henri de Bylandt drafted the first breed standard for the Pyrennean Sheepdog - is this relevant? is the dog named for this famous patron?
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 10:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Hannah Kinghern (Kdoc) on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 09:44 pm:

It appears that a certain Henri de Bylandt drafted the first breed standard for the Pyrennean Sheepdog - is this relevant? it most certainly is - well done :) is the dog named for this famous patron? well, not any more. But the efforts of M le Comte Henri de Bylandt led for a while to the appellation "Henris" for Pyrenean mountain dogs.

Bearing a marble bust of Henri I of France, a photograph of Thierry Henry, and accompanied by a sheepdog, I approach the third doorkeeper. His face breaks into a broad smile. "I thought that might prove too difficult for you", he says. "But you have found your three French Henris, and now..."

He opens the third door and waves me through into...
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

....
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 - 11:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

... another room containing ...
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 12:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not exactly a room - this is a barn. It contains:

An old rusty bucket
A spinning wheel (which would have been useful a little earlier, but that's life)
A three-legged stool
A pair of Wellington boots
A ladder

The ceiling of the barn appears to have a hole in it. There is a door at the far end of the barn, against which a doorkeeper is leaning.
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 9:09 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Please could you do the honours and survey each new item and provide a detailed description of all the salient points?
Ostap Bender (Ostap)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 9:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe four jolly words will do it here?
Go to the doorkeeper and tell him four jolly words. Maybe he will let you pass for your ingenuity.
(if not, it was at least worth a try)

and belated Merry Christmas, Woubit!
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 12:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 09:09 am:

Please could you do the honours and survey each new item and provide a detailed description of all the salient points? The old rusty bucket has a hole in the bottom - it doesn't look as though it will be much use in its presesnt state. The spinning wheel seems perfectly serviceable. The three-legged stool is made of wood - it seems sturdy enough. The Wellington boots are green - there is nothing inside them. The ladder is a ladder.

By Ostap Bender (Ostap) on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 09:50 am:

Maybe four jolly words will do it here? A most ingenious notion.
Go to the doorkeeper and tell him four jolly words. Maybe he will let you pass for your ingenuity. I approach the doorkeeper. "Merry Christmas to you!" I cry in my jolliest voice. "If that's the best you can do", he replies, "you'll still be here to wish me a Happy New Year."
(if not, it was at least worth a try) Indeed :)

and belated Merry Christmas, Woubit! Thank you, and the same to you.
Simon Downham (Beroean)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 1:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do you think that we could escape from the barn without handing anything over to the doorkeeper?
Please could you ask the doorkeeper what it will take for him to allow us to depart?

Have the Chinese Restaurant delivered the menu yet?
Did they leave a calling card?

Do you think the bucket would be any good as a receptacle if we repaired the hole?

Can you use the ladder to reach the barn ceiling?
If so, please can you tell us what you can see?

Is the spinning wheel of the old fashioned type for spinning wool?
Is it made from wood? Any inscriptions? Does it have metal parts? A needle? Any yarn? Any useful parts that we could dismantle and remove?

Will Daisy allow you to milk her if you sit on the stool?
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 2:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By Simon Downham (Beroean) on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 01:57 pm:

Do you think that we could escape from the barn without handing anything over to the doorkeeper? I am not sure.
Please could you ask the doorkeeper what it will take for him to allow us to depart? "You should know the rules by now", he says. "You need to give me what I require to allow you out of this barn. Mere words won't do it, though I appreciate your good wishes just the same."

Have the Chinese Restaurant delivered the menu yet? If they have, it has not been brought to me yet.
Did they leave a calling card? Another ingenious notion :) But a check with the first doorkeeper indicates that nothing has in fact been delivered.

Do you think the bucket would be any good as a receptacle if we repaired the hole? I should think so, indeed.

Can you use the ladder to reach the barn ceiling? Yes
If so, please can you tell us what you can see? This is a hayloft. It is full of straw. There is a pitchfork leaning against the wall.

Is the spinning wheel of the old fashioned type for spinning wool? It seems to be.
Is it made from wood? Yes. Any inscriptions? the letters "J & W G" appear carved on the rim of the wheel. There is no other writing that I can see. Does it have metal parts? It is made entirely of wood. A needle? No Any yarn? No Any useful parts that we could dismantle and remove? I really am not sure this is a wise course. I could probably take the thing apart, but I am not at all sure I could put it back together again. It looks a pretty complex piece of equipment.

Will Daisy allow you to milk her if you sit on the stool? She does not appear keen on the idea at all.
John Morahan (Wunderland)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 3:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Take four cards from the pack, climb the ladder and drop them from the top.
David Burn (Woubit)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 3:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By John Morahan (Wunderland) on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 03:04 pm:

Take four cards from the pack, climb the ladder and drop them from the top. The levels of ingenuity being displayed here are truly astounding :) I have removed four cards from the deck - may as well make them the aces, since it's the only time in my life I will ever hold four aces. I have climbed the ladder and released the cards.

They flutter to the floor, apart from the one that lands in the bucket. I pick them up and take them to the doorkeeper. "Here you are", I say. "Four falling cards."

"And a Happy New Year to you too" he says, and turns away.

A vicious little dwarf emerges from the shadows. He throws an axe at me, which misses. Must have wandered in from some other puzzle.
Tommy Petersson (Tommyp)
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 4:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"You're in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike" - yet another puzzle...

Also googled before and found that Henri de Bylandt, but had no idea about what to present to the guard for acceptance so I "forever held my silence" - well, almost a day...

The most disturbing is that "all this" probably and seemingly comes from some literature several people here knows of, and I don't... Thought for a while it could be Henri Duke of Guise and the two Henri III, one of whom became Henri IV, but didn't get any of that to fit into this puzzle...


Now when there seems no more need for any Henri/Henry, I found another one:

There's a hole in my bucket dear liza dear liza
There's a hole in my bucket dear liza a hole.
Then mend it dear henry dear henry...


On that theme, a bottle of Bourbon would be more useful, but it seems as mentioned totally the wrong track.

So, when you stand on the ladder and look through the hole in the barn ceiling - you don't see outside but rather (only) up to the hayloft?