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Lateral Puzzles » Solved Lateral Thinking Puzzles » Solved Puzzles - May 2007 » [Crazypalpig] This and that « Previous Next »

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Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 498
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 5:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This was in that, and yet that was in this(A quickee i think)
Mani (Mani)
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Post Number: 210
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 3:27 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, some boring semantical questions to begin with:

Does the 1st 'in' have approximately the same meaning as the second 'in'?

'this' nr 1 = 'this' nr 2?
'that' nr 1 = 'that' nr 2?
'this' = 'that'?
1st 'this' = 1st 'that'?
1st 'this' = 2nd 'that'?
2nd 'this' = 1st 'that'?
2nd 'this' = 2nd 'that'?

Furthermore, assuming that 1st 'this' = 2nd 'this', 1st 'that' = 2nd 'that' and 'this' not equal to 'that':
Was 'this' in 'that' at the same time as 'that' was in 'this'?
Was 'this' a physical object? Which it was possible to touch?
Was 'that' a physical object? Which it was possible to touch?
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 501
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 1:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, some boring semantical questions to begin with: OK, fine

Does the 1st 'in' have approximately the same meaning as the second 'in'?Um... Kinda, Yope?

'this' nr 1 = 'this' nr 2?Yope
'that' nr 1 = 'that' nr 2? Yes
'this' = 'that'? No way
1st 'this' = 1st 'that'? Nope
1st 'this' = 2nd 'that'? no
2nd 'this' = 1st 'that'?ditto
2nd 'this' = 2nd 'that'? ditto
Furthermore, assuming that 1st 'this' = 2nd 'this', 1st 'that' = 2nd 'that' and 'this' not equal to 'that':
Was 'this' in 'that' at the same time as 'that' was in 'this'?yes
Was 'this' a physical object? Which it was possible to touch?Which one, the first or second? The second, yes, 1st, no
Was 'that' a physical object? Which it was possible to touch?Hm... No
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 542
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 3:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, there is something common about the this's
Snoozer (Snoozer)
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Post Number: 79
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 1:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a well known saying?
Is it that the first and second 'this' spelled the same way, but have slightly different meaning due to context?
The That's, are they both spelled the same way and have the same meaning?
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 579
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 3:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a well known saying? This isn't a saying Is it that the first and second 'this' spelled the same way, but have slightly different meaning due to context?Exactly!
The That's, are they both spelled the same way and have the same meaning?Yep
Zephyr14 (Zephyr14)
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Post Number: 2
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 07, 2007 - 1:05 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So there are 3 relevant things? A was in B, and yet B was in C? with A and C homonyms? Or identical words with the same origin, but used in different contexts? I'll clarify the question if needed.

C is a physical, tangible object, and A and B are intangible? Are they concepts? names?

Does it help to reformulate the puzzle statement this way? Or does it hide information?

The first 'was in': does it describe inclusion? positioning? some kind of status? other?
Same q's for the second 'was in', please.

Are any of them locations such as cities, countries, continents?

Is this a joke? A pun?
Snoozer (Snoozer)
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Post Number: 132
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, January 08, 2007 - 5:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does the second part contradict the first part?
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 589
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 11, 2007 - 10:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So there are 3 relevant things? A was in B, and yet B was in C? with A and C homonyms?Yes to all Or identical words with the same origin, but used in different contexts?They are identical, clarify the rest for me please I'll clarify the question if needed.

C is a physical, tangible object, and A and B are intangible?Yes Are they concepts?Yes names?

Does it help to reformulate the puzzle statement this way? Or does it hide information? ??? Rephrase

The first 'was in': does it describe inclusion?Yes to this one only positioning? some kind of status? other?
Same q's for the second 'was in', please. And the exact same answer

Are any of them locations such as cities, countries, continents?
Nope
Is this a joke? A pun?A pun possibly

Does the second part contradict the first part?It might seem like it, wouldn't it? But no!
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 590
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 11, 2007 - 10:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And my brain cells have deserted me.I forgot to put my name in the puzzle.Oops.Can a very nice admin bod put it in.Thanxxx

AND DON'T DO THE SAME THING TO MY PUZZLE AS YOU DID TO LEMONS!
Berettaface (Berettaface)
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Post Number: 1
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Tuesday, January 30, 2007 - 12:09 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are A and B similar concepts? or are they different? Would you associate either of them with C normally, or just in this context?
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 620
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Posted on Tuesday, January 30, 2007 - 10:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are A and B similar concepts? or are they different?this Would you associate either of them with C normally, or just in this context?Um... I guess the first one, normally, second, no
Zephyr14 (Zephyr14)
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Post Number: 94
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 12:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

AFAIK homonyms are words that only have in common the spelling, but are completely unrelated in meaning and (I guess) origin/etymology. A canonical example seems the english word "calf", which has the meaning of young cattle and west germanic etymology, or the meaning of part of the leg, with old norse etymology. In short, the two forms of the word are completely unrelated

This is opposed to, for example, table meaning four-legged surface or meaning bidimensional form of organising data in (lines and columns), as they both originate form the latin word tabula which means slate, flat stone, and they are obviously (though pretty distant) related meanings.

In which category do A and C fall?
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 627
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 1:20 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

AFAIK homonyms are words that only have in common the spelling, but are completely unrelated in meaning and (I guess) origin/etymology. A canonical example seems the english word "calf", which has the meaning of young cattle and west germanic etymology, or the meaning of part of the leg, with old norse etymology. In short, the two forms of the word are completely unrelated Actually, i am not sure

This is opposed to, for example, table meaning four-legged surface or meaning bidimensional form of organising data in (lines and columns), as they both originate form the latin word tabula which means slate, flat stone, and they are obviously (though pretty distant) related meanings.

In which category do A and C fall?I THINK they both come from the same latin word
Zephyr14 (Zephyr14)
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Post Number: 98
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 2:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So in the "B was in C" part, we have a concept that is included in a tangible object. Is it something along the lines of "love was put in this meal"? Or is it a different type of inclusion?
Don_corleone (Don_corleone)
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Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Monday, February 05, 2007 - 10:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

a sinking ship?

water was in the ship yet the ship was in the water

a floating balloon?

air was in the balloon yet the balloon was in the air


could go on with more...
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 632
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Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So in the "B was in C" part, we have a concept that is included in a tangible object. Is it something along the lines of "love was put in this meal"? Or is it a different type of inclusion?completely different

a sinking ship?

water was in the ship yet the ship was in the water

a floating balloon?

air was in the balloon yet the balloon was in the air


could go on with more..none of these.
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 890
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Posted on Tuesday, May 01, 2007 - 1:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hint: Think of the alphabet
Booklover (Booklover)
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Post Number: 75
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 02, 2007 - 5:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

how about this:

the letter "i" is the word "iris"; you have an "iris" in your "eye"

so...
this was in that, yet that was in this--
i was in iris, yet iris was in eye?
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 913
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 02, 2007 - 8:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

how about this:

the letter "i" is the word "iris"; you have an "iris" in your "eye"

so...
this was in that, yet that was in this--
i was in iris, yet iris was in eye?OOH thats a good one... I think you could've made that one into a this and that 2 :-)

Make the hint "think of an object in the alphabet
Booklover (Booklover)
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Post Number: 83
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 02, 2007 - 10:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, how about this one...
There was a "b" in the word "alphabet", and the "alphabet" was in a "bee" (as in spelling bee)?
if this isn't it, I'll have to think of another object in the alphabet!
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 914
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Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2007 - 12:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, how about this one...
There was a "b" in the word "alphabet", and the "alphabet" was in a "bee" (as in spelling bee)?
if this isn't it, I'll have to think of another object in the alphabetOK, this is not it, what are the OBJECTS in the alphabet called?!?
Emeraldink (Emeraldink)
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Post Number: 95
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2007 - 5:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Letter is in word, but word is in letter.
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
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Post Number: 919
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2007 - 9:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Letter is in word, but word is in letter.Good Job!!!
************************SPOILER!!!!************************
I thought of this one after I just wrote a letter to my penpal... so I got this one after i thought that letters were in a word, but the real letter contained a lot of words

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