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Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Post Number: 3049
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How did an Indian weapon inspire an American popular song?
Balin (Balin)
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Username: Balin

Post Number: 1244
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:20 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Indian = Native American? India-n?

Is the song from the past decade? From the 1900s?
Markobr (Markobr)
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Post Number: 767
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Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:29 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A weapon: for shooting? to be thrown? A blunt weapon? cut or thrust weapon? Some kind of knife?

Popular song: Is there someone known to have written the song's text? The tune?
Ohlala8 (Ohlala8)
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Post Number: 578
Registered: 6-2009
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the name of the weapon actually mentioned in the song's lyrics? Is it a story song?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Post Number: 3053
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Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Indian = Native American? India-n? This.

Is the song from the past decade? From the 1900s? Neither.

A weapon: for shooting? This. to be thrown? A blunt weapon? cut or thrust weapon? Some kind of knife?

Popular song: Is there someone known to have written the song's text? Yes. The tune? Yes.

Is the name of the weapon actually mentioned in the song's lyrics? Yes. Is it a story song? Yesish.
Balin (Balin)
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Username: Balin

Post Number: 1256
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the weapon for shooting arrows? Bullets? Something else?

Is the song from [LTPF list of centuries]?
Ohlala8 (Ohlala8)
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Username: Ohlala8

Post Number: 583
Registered: 6-2009
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Random guess: the national anthem?
Woodworm (Woodworm)
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Username: Woodworm

Post Number: 1742
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Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 10:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do most people know, when they hear the song, that the word in question means an Indian weapon? Or does the word have another meaning?

Did the weapon perhaps give its name to something else, which then appeared in the song?

Is the weapon some type of musket? A firearm of sorts? Perhaps 'long tall sally' was a nickname for a bazooka? Something along those lines?

Just to clarify: the song was written before 1900? (Only because 'the 1900s' can mean the twentieth century or its first decade.)

Is it a song from the War of Independence? The Civil War? Hutchinson Family? Tin Pan Alley? Song from a musical?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Username: Jenburdoo

Post Number: 3057
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 11:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the weapon for shooting arrows? Bullets? Something else? This.

Is the song from [LTPF list of centuries]? 19th.

Random guess: the national anthem? Yes. I reckoned this'd be a quickie.

Do most people know, when they hear the song, that the word in question means an Indian weapon? No. Or does the word have another meaning? No.

Did the weapon perhaps give its name to something else, which then appeared in the song? No.

Is the weapon some type of musket? A firearm of sorts? Perhaps 'long tall sally' was a nickname for a bazooka? Something along those lines? {No.}

Just to clarify: the song was written before 1900? (Only because 'the 1900s' can mean the twentieth century or its first decade.) Yes.

Is it a song from the War of Independence? The Civil War? Hutchinson Family? Tin Pan Alley? Song from a musical? None of these.
Balin (Balin)
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Username: Balin

Post Number: 1261
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 11:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shooting rockets? Is the weapon mentioned in the first verse (the one everyone sings)?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Username: Jenburdoo

Post Number: 3058
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 11:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shooting rockets? Yes. Is the weapon mentioned in the first verse (the one everyone sings)? Yes.
Galfisk (Galfisk)
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Username: Galfisk

Post Number: 2168
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Thursday, June 24, 2010 - 5:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Star-Spangled Banner?
"And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air"
Are we trying to find out how the rockets ended up in the national anthem? Did the author see them? Fire them? Or was he fired upon?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Username: Jenburdoo

Post Number: 3065
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Friday, June 25, 2010 - 12:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Star-Spangled Banner? Yup.
"And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air" Yup.
Are we trying to find out how the rockets ended up in the national anthem? How did a weapon system from halfway around the world end up in the national anthem? Did the author see them? Yes. Fire them? Or was he fired upon? Neither. Most Americans (and by extension, a large proportion of LTPF puzzlers) know the origin of he Star-Spangled Banner, so you are free to look it up on Wikipedia if you like. It's not particularly important.
Balin (Balin)
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Username: Balin

Post Number: 1360
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Friday, June 25, 2010 - 1:02 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the weapon used by the British in the Battle of Fort McHenry? And Francis Scott Key was watching (I think he might have been taken prisoner)?

Did the British acquire the weapon through trade? War? Copying the technique?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Username: Jenburdoo

Post Number: 3066
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Friday, June 25, 2010 - 1:59 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the weapon used by the British in the Battle of Fort McHenry? Yep. And Francis Scott Key was watching (I think he might have been taken prisoner)? He was checking on a friend of his who was a prisoner, and the British wouldn't let him leave. With reason, since he'd seen their plans.

Did the British acquire the weapon through trade? War? This. Copying the technique? And this.

*******************

Spoilers go Boom!

*******************

The British got the idea a scant decade or two earlier in India, while fighting Hyder Ali and Tippu Sultan. These princes were known for their advanced rocket artillery, and kicked the crap out of a couple British columns with it before the Brits defeated them around 1799. A British engineer named Congreve replicated the rockets, which were attached to purpose-built ships and used for bombardment. The "bombs bursting in air" were a similar concept, an early form of mortar, and placed on ships called bomb ketches.

Fort McHenry was bombarded for 24 hours; despite all that newfangled technology, only four Americans were killed.

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