[woubit] Since you ask Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Lateral Puzzles » Solved Lateral Thinking Puzzles » Solved Puzzles - November 2010 » [woubit] Since you ask « Previous Next »

Author Message
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1097
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 4:19 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On coterie? Bog off, loo boy. Emirate melody.

In what circumstances did I utter the above in answer to an entirely serious question?
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1362
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 5:02 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hurrah! a puzzle by the renowned mr. woubit! =D I shall certainly try my best. by any chance, is this mr. woubit's yearly christmas puzzle? (yes I know, November barely started, but the holiday rush, and all)
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1363
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 5:04 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

oh, and my questions went unasked. lol.

"I" = you, mr. woubit?
if not, "I" = H/A/M? H/A/F?
Same to question asker?

Is the place relevant? the time? Was it a recent incident?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1098
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 5:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"I" = you, mr. woubit? indeed
if not, "I" = H/A/M? H/A/F?
Same to question asker? there were in fact two "question-askers", both of whom were adult humans and one of whom was male (the gender of the other being left as an exercise for the reader).

Is the place relevant? yes the time? no Was it a recent incident? it happened about twenty five years ago, which is "recent" for svv of "recent".

This is not woubit's Christmas puzzle, which will not appear until December despite the vexations daily visited upon a poor woubit whose journey to and from work is currently made vastly more difficult by the closure of Oxford Street for the installation of the Christmas lights.
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1364
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 5:28 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

well, in kaylee's book, twenty five years is not at all recent, that being nearly the entire span of the kaylee's life (I will be twenty six in May) so kaylee commends mr. woubit's memory, because mr. woubit is of course brilliant, as we all know. kaylee shall be awaiting mr. woubit's Christmas puzzle with great anticipation.

May we call Question Asker 1, the confirmed H/A/M, Matt? (kaylee believes it is a good name)
May we call Question Asker 2, the laeftr H/A, Pat?
(not only does it rhyme with Matt, it is equally usable for either gender, as I had pointed out to me recently in my own puzzle). I hope mr. woubit shall not take offense at my explaining my reasoning. I am sure mr. woubit does understand it, but it is just habit to explain.

the place: (LTPF list of continents, if mr. woubit would not mind, and if it matters)?

the time is not relevant, but it was twenty-five years ago, so in 1985. Could it potentially have happened in an earlier decade/year? A later one? (Just double checking)

Was mr. woubit in the great city of London, England at the time? Or elsewhere?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1099
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 6:08 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

May we call Question Asker 1, the confirmed H/A/M, Matt? (kaylee believes it is a good name) assuming that "Matt" is an abbreviation for "Matthew", this derives from a Hebrew phrase meaning "gift of the Lord". It is my opinion that anyone who regards himself as God's gift is probably deluded, but if you tell me that Matt is a good name, then a good name it is.

May we call Question Asker 2, the laeftr H/A, Pat?
(not only does it rhyme with Matt, it is equally usable for either gender, as I had pointed out to me recently in my own puzzle). I hope mr. woubit shall not take offense at my explaining my reasoning. I am sure mr. woubit does understand it, but it is just habit to explain. assuming that Pat is an abbreviation for Patricia (or, as it might be, Patrick) this derives from a Latin word meaning "of noble birth". It is my opinion that many people of noble birth are more or less useless, but if you tell me that Pat is a good name, then a good name it is.

the place: (LTPF list of continents, if mr. woubit would not mind, and if it matters)? this incident took place in the city of Moscow on the continent of... well, there is some debate about this. Suffice to say that by "Moscow" I mean the capital city of what was at that time the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and I leave you to make up your own mind as to whether this is in Europe or in Asia.

the time is not relevant, but it was twenty-five years ago, so in 1985. Could it potentially have happened in an earlier decade/year? A later one? (Just double checking) it could certainly have happened in an earlier year - whether or not it could have happened in a later one I cannot be absolutely certain, but I have no reason to believe that it could not have happened yesterday, nor that it could not happen again tomorrow

Was mr. woubit in the great city of London, England at the time? Or elsewhere? I was in Moscow at the time
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 958
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 7:54 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did you previously meet Matt? Pat? Were they relatives of yours? Friends? Were they British? Russians? Other? Did they both ask you questions? Is their profession relevant? Is aristocracy relevant?

Could this have happened in another city? In another country? Is the political system relevant? Is it relevant why you were in Moscow at the time?

Was the entire puzzle statement uttered as an answer to one question? More than one?

The Emirate melody refers to a musical piece? UAE relevant? Arsenal?
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1365
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 2:51 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kaylee is not sure whether the only matt she knows personally (Balin) believes himself to be such, but he is certainly a gift to the LTPF, for he has made several puzzles that inspire kaylee to keep puzzling...including one he dedicated t mr. woubit. as for pat, I do not know any personally, but it was suggested on my "Would you like chips with that?" puzzle as a name for the person being figured out, who happened to be Potato. I still do not know Potato's real name, but she is certainly female (she told us so)

Emirate made me think of the UAE, too, but I don't know anything about them but the name and general location. (I do not know if mr. woubit permits Google and Wikipedia when his puzzlers become stuck).
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1366
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 2:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

that should be, dedicated to mr. woubit, of course.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1100
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 3:08 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did you previously meet Matt? yes Pat? yes Were they relatives of yours? no Friends? yes Were they British? yes Russians? no Other? no Did they both ask you questions? yes Is their profession relevant? no Is aristocracy relevant? no

Could this have happened in another city? yes In another country? not really Is the political system relevant? no Is it relevant why you were in Moscow at the time? no

Was the entire puzzle statement uttered as an answer to one question? yes More than one? no

The Emirate melody refers to a musical piece? no UAE relevant? no Arsenal? no

Emirate made me think of the UAE, too, but I don't know anything about them but the name and general location. (I do not know if mr. woubit permits Google and Wikipedia when his puzzlers become stuck). all aids to reference may be freely used in woubit puzzles
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8121
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 3:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was Matt able to speak Russian? Was Pat? Were you? Are you currently? Were they asking about pronunciation? Of something Russian?

Seeing as we're talking about Russia here, and the US midterm elections have just passed, I feel obligated to mention Sarah Palin (of "I can see Russia from my house" fame), who has an enormous political following. How this is so, I do not understand. Although I am a registered Republican, if she were running unopposed, or better yet, against the dead candidate who got elected in California, I would vote for the dead person.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1101
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 3:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was Matt able to speak Russian? no Was Pat? no Were you? yes Are you currently? not as well as I could then Were they asking about pronunciation? no Of something Russian? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8129
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 6:03 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was Matt trying to say something in Russian? Was Pat? Were you translating something?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1102
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 6:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was Matt trying to say something in Russian? no Was Pat? no Were you translating something? yope
Woodworm (Woodworm)
New member
Username: Woodworm

Post Number: 2354
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 7:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this a phonetic transliteration of a Russian phrase?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1103
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 9:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this a phonetic transliteration of a Russian phrase? not really, but this is along the right lines...
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1371
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 9:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were you trying to teach them how to say something in Russian? Something that sounded like those English phrases, but meant something else? So you responded with those to the question, and it meant one thing in English and another in Russian?
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8138
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 9:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is a Russian phrase relevant? Some form of Russian text?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1104
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2010 - 11:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were you trying to teach them how to say something in Russian? no Something that sounded like those English phrases, but meant something else? I was not trying to teach them anything, but this is along the right lines So you responded with those to the question, and it meant one thing in English and another in Russian? and so is this

Is a Russian phrase relevant? yope Some form of Russian text? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8159
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 3:03 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The second word in what you said - is it relevant how to pronounce it? If so, how exactly is "coterie" pronounced?
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 964
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 7:56 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the name Katherine relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1105
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 9:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The second word in what you said - is it relevant how to pronounce it? to some extent If so, how exactly is "coterie" pronounced? the first syllable rhymes more or less with "coat", the second is "er" and the third rhymes with "see", thus "coat-er-ee" with the stress on the first syllable. The word is French but has passed into English; it means a small and exclusive group of people with some interest or occupation in common. None of this matters except the pronunciation.

Is the name Katherine relevant? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8161
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 12:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is any name relevant? The meaning of names?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1106
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 1:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is any name relevant? not especially The meaning of names? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8166
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 1:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could this happen today...in Moscow? In another communist country? Is communism relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1107
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 2:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could this happen today...in Moscow? yes In another communist country? in some, but not all communist countries Is communism relevant? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8170
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 2:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it relevant where in Moscow you were? Is technology relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1108
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 2:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it relevant where in Moscow you were? yes Is technology relevant? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8181
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 2:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were you in Red Square? At another landmark? At a specific building?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1109
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 4:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were you in Red Square? no At another landmark? yes, for svv of "landmark" At a specific building? no, except for vvv of "building"
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 966
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 4:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does one need a background in Russian to solve this puzzle? Some Pushkin poems would be enough or a full command of the language is required?
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1388
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 4:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

kaylee is convinced that this is another fine woubit puzzle by mr. woubit, and it is still being followed, though it is as yet beyond her ability to solve. we shall see where it goes...this is fun =)
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1110
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 4:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does one need a background in Russian to solve this puzzle? it would help, but it is not necessary Some Pushkin poems would be enough or a full command of the language is required? Pushkin poems would be of no help at all
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8183
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 5:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

At a relevant location?

Is a Russian author anyhow relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1111
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 5:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

At a relevant location? yes

Is a Russian author anyhow relevant? no
Kdoc (Kdoc)
New member
Username: Kdoc

Post Number: 1087
Registered: 7-2001
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 7:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

are the meanings of the words as written down in the puzzle at all relevant? the sounds they mkae? was it necessary to speak them aloud for the desired effect? could you have written them down for the same effect?
is the punctuation relevant? is it there just to allow the words to make some sort of sense? would it have had the same effect without the punctuation?
could the words have been spoken in a different order for the same effect?
were you giving information when saying this? asking for information? were you joking? were you trying to be secretive? were you worried about being overheard? was this some sort of code? are anagrams relevant?

did the people you spoke to understand what you meant? did you intend them to? should we be considering the syllables separately? the letters separately?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1112
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 7:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

are the meanings of the words as written down in the puzzle at all relevant? not especially the sounds they make? yes - Woodworm was on the same track, but I say again that the English words are not exactly a "phonetic" rendering of a Russian sentence... was it necessary to speak them aloud for the desired effect? no, but... could you have written them down for the same effect? ...that would have been rather laborious
is the punctuation relevant? no is it there just to allow the words to make some sort of sense? yes would it have had the same effect without the punctuation? more or less
could the words have been spoken in a different order for the same effect? noish
were you giving information when saying this? not really asking for information? not at all were you joking? to some extent were you trying to be secretive? no were you worried about being overheard? no was this some sort of code? no are anagrams relevant? no

did the people you spoke to understand what you meant? no did you intend them to? I knew that they would not should we be considering the syllables separately? that could be useful the letters separately? but that could not
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8189
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 9:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were you giving a suitable English-ish pronunciation of a Russian phrase? Like that one puzzle about the Welsh anthem, and the English words used for pronouncing it ("butter the hens as they fly" or something like that)?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1114
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 9:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were you giving a suitable English-ish pronunciation of a Russian phrase? Like that one puzzle about the Welsh anthem, and the English words used for pronouncing it ("butter the hens as they fly" or something like that)? something exactly like that - well done. For those who missed the puzzle (and I am surprised to find it still in existence) I reproduce here the Welsh and "English" versions of Mae Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau, or Land of my Fathers to give its usual Saesneg title. Of course, the "English" is not a translation of the Welsh - it was written to enable non-Welsh rugby supporters to join in the singing of the opposition's National Anthem instead of jeering at it.

Mae hen wlad fy nhadau yn annwyl i mi,
Gwlad beirdd a chantorion, enwogion o fri;
Ei gwrol ryfelwyr, gwladgarwyr tra md,
Dros ryddid collasant eu gwaed.

Gwlad, gwlad, pleidiol wyf i'm gwlad.
Tra mr yn fur i'r bur hoff bau,
O bydded i'r hen iaith barhau.


My hen laid a haddock, one hand oiled a flea,
Glad farts and centurions threw dogs in the sea,
I could stew a hare here and brandish Dan's flan,
Don's ruddy bog's blocked up with sand.

Dad! Dad! Why don't you oil Auntie Glad?
Can whores appear in beer bottle pies?
O butter the hens as they fly!


Assistance with decoding the "Russian" will be provided if required, but you may have some fun finding out for yourself what it was I was trying to say. To do this, it would help to discover by the usual means where I was and why, therefore, I was saying it.
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1393
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Saturday, November 06, 2010 - 9:51 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

for mr. woubit's records, that is what I meant by my earlier question about saying one thing that sounded like another...I just could not think of the example I wanted, and Balin asked the question much better than I did. *ponders what mr. woubit could have been doing, as I have no knowledge of Russian whatsoever, not even how to count to ten which I know in at least three other languages*
Kaygee (Kaygee)
New member
Username: Kaygee

Post Number: 612
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 12:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Russian location: Is it an historical site? political? religious? cultural? sports-related?

Where you and your friends on a holiday? business trip? special event? a lay-over on the way to "somewhere" else?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1115
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 1:05 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Russian location: Is it an historical site? yes, I suppose you could call it that political? no religious? you could call it that also cultural? and that sports-related? but not that

Were you and your friends on a holiday? business trip? special event? a lay-over on the way to "somewhere" else? could have been any of those - it does not matter. I will attempt a

***** RECAP *****

The three of us were at a place in Moscow that was not a building as such; but it was a place with historical, religious and cultural significance.

My two friends, called Matt and Pat in this puzzle, asked me a series of questions relating to something they had found in this place.

I answered the last of those questions with the words that make up the puzzle statement:

On coterie? Bog off, loo boy. Emirate melody.

This was, in effect, a jocular attempt to utter a Russian sentence as though it were some English sentences (not an attempt to translate the Russian sentence into English). My friends spoke no Russian at all and knew nothing of the language; I spoke Russian very badly, as will become clear when the solution is revealed (although my "Russian" had improved towards the end of the "English" sentences).
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8195
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 1:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it a religious building? A shrine? A supposed holy site?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1116
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 1:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it a religious building? it was not a "building" A shrine? but it contained some of these, for svv of "shrine" A supposed holy site? and was this
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8198
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:28 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a holy site for the Orthodox church? The Catholic church?

Is it catacombs? A monastery?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1117
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a holy site for the Orthodox church? The Catholic church?

Is it catacombs? well, this is close enough. It was (and still is) a cemetery - the Novodevichy Cemetery, to be exact A monastery?
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8201
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:38 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is a specific grave relevant? Or tomb? Chekhov?
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8202
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:40 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Random side note: When I was in Peru this past April, I went to catacombs in Lima. I now know that I can handle seeing human bones just fine. Except for skulls. They're creepy. *shudders at the thought*
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1118
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is a specific grave relevant? the question I was asked related to a "specific" grave in that it was the grave on which my friends found the inscription about which they asked me. But no one famous was buried in that grave, so that whose grave it was does not matter. What matters is what was written on the gravestone. Or tomb? no Chekhov? and no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8203
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it an epitaph? A saying? Quote? Scripture?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1119
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it an epitaph? yes A saying? it has acquired a proverbial character nowadays, yes Quote? and is often quoted Scripture? but is not part of the sacred writings of any religion
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1408
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is it a well-known proverb in English? Or Russian? Has it got anything to do with vodka?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1120
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 2:56 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is it a well-known proverb in English? it is not in the "stitch in time saves nine" category, and you might or might not recognize it; whether that means it is "well-known" or not is laeftr Or Russian? see above, but as a clue, there are other options Has it got anything to do with vodka? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8208
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 3:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a humorous saying? Serious? Intended as a piece of advice? As a wise saying? Did it originate in [LTPF list of centuries]? Does the proverb come from England? The US?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1121
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 3:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a humorous saying? no Serious? yes Intended as a piece of advice? perhaps As a wise saying? perhaps, but its attribution is far from clear in the first place Did it originate in [LTPF list of centuries]? in the third or fourth centuries BC Does the proverb come from England? The US? from neither, nor does it come from Russia...
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 968
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 9:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bog off loo boy = love of God, or something along these lines?

Did the saying originate in Europe? Greece? Asia?
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8217
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 12:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the saying Roman in origin? From elsewhere in Italy?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1122
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 3:17 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bog off loo boy = love of God, or something along these lines? along those lines indeed - the actual words mean "... the Gods love ..."

Did the saying originate in Europe?yes Greece? yes Asia? no

Is the saying Roman in origin? no, but help has arrived - see above From elsewhere in Italy?
Kayleetonkslupin (Kayleetonkslupin)
New member
Username: Kayleetonkslupin

Post Number: 1423
Registered: 9-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 3:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

off topic, I have sent mr. woubit an email with pictures from Russia that my grandfather sent me. I hope mr. woubit shall enjoy them :-)

The Gods love...those who love them? Random guess, as I have no idea.
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 969
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 4:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it a saying likely to be found in Greece classics? Maybe Homer? Hesiod? Or merely a saying not attributable to any famous writer?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1123
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 6:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Gods love...those who love them? Random guess, as I have no idea. no - "the Gods love" is part of a description of a person or group of people; the Gods themselves are not the subject of the sentence and "love" is not the main verb. Thank you for the pictures - most interesting.

Is it a saying likely to be found in Greece classics? it is to be found in the works of the dramatist Menander, and has been adapted by many later authors writing in Greek and in other languages Maybe Homer? but not Homer Hesiod? and not Hesiod, both of whom had died many centuries before Menander was born Or merely a saying not attributable to any famous writer? see above - other writers have expressed the sentiment in different ways
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 970
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 8:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lacking the insight into Greek poetry, I'd just mention the link between Menander and Col. Lawrence and ask the simple question: is there any who hasn't identified himself with col. Lawrence? (I'm referring of course to the introductory portion of the Seven Pillars)

On topic: Alea iacta est relevant? Scatofagos?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1124
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 9:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alea iacta est relevant? no Scatofagos? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8228
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 9:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Gods too love a joke?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1125
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 11:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Gods too love a joke? no - again, "the Gods" are not the subject of the sentence, nor is "love" the main verb
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8244
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Sunday, November 07, 2010 - 11:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the quote from one of his plays? A complete one? Or one that is nearly so?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1126
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 1:27 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the quote from one of his plays? A complete one? Or one that is nearly so? only fragments remain of Menander's Dis Exapaton [The Double Deceiver] from which this quotation was taken
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 972
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 5:27 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

He whom the gods love dies while he is young? The melody should be related to youth, anyway.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1127
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 12:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

He whom the gods love dies while he is young? excellent - well done The melody should be related to youth, anyway. indeed - the Russian is pronounced roughly

on, kotori bogi lyuboi, umiraet molodi

(except that "kotori" was an error because it is plural rather than singular, but I had not been studying Russian very long).

Now, why did I choose to pronounce the Russian words as though they were English words?
Rbruma (Rbruma)
New member
Username: Rbruma

Post Number: 975
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 12:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were your friends asking to read the russian inscription for them? To hear how it is pronounced? Did they say something like: woubit, what's written over there? And in reply you uttered the puzzle statement?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1128
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 2:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Were your friends asking to read the russian inscription for them? no - FA To hear how it is pronounced? no Did they say something like: woubit, what's written over there? something very like this, but you need more detail... And in reply you uttered the puzzle statement? ...I did
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8257
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 4:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the text an inscription? Was it written down? Was the text written in Russian?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1129
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 4:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the text an inscription? yes Was it written down? yes Was the text written in Russian? no
Noel (Noel)
New member
Username: Noel

Post Number: 2021
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 5:03 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the question in reference to some English text? Some text in another language? Did your friends say 'woubit, how would you say that in Russian'?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1130
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 5:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the question in reference to some English text? no Some text in another language? yes Did your friends say 'woubit, how would you say that in Russian'? no
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8266
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 9:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the text in a Romance language? In a dead language? In Greek? Latin?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1131
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 10:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the text in a Romance language? In a dead language? In Greek? this one - since it was, after all, a quotation from the Greek, it was reasonable enough that it should be in Greek Latin?
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8295
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 10:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did they ask what the Greek letters meant? Did they think the quote was in Russian? Were you able to read the Greek?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 1132
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 11:46 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did they ask what the Greek letters meant? well, they asked what the inscription said Did they think the quote was in Russian? yes Were you able to read the Greek? yes, and I think that will do:

***** SPOILER *****

On a trip to Moscow some years ago, a group of us visited the Novodevichy Cemetery.

"Come over here", said my friend Matt, who with his wife Pat had been examining some grave or other. "There's some Russian we'd like you to translate."

I went over there, and saw that the grave was of a child; it bore the inscription (as nearly as can be reproduced here)

on oi theoi filousin apothneski neos

pronounced roughly "hon hoi theoi filousin apothneskei neos" and meaning, as discovered, "he whom the gods love dies young".

"That's not Russian", I said. "That's Greek."

"Well", asked Pat, "if it were Russian, what would it say in English?"

To which I solemnly (and perhaps over-literally) replied... but you know the rest.

Well done everyone.
Balin (Balin)
New member
Username: Balin

Post Number: 8305
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 12:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Now I'm wondering what kind of epitaph the puzzle statement would make, and if so, who would have that as their epitaph. My mind is weird - I guess that's just a consequence of Tuesday mornings.

Fun puzzle!
Biograd (Biograd)
New member
Username: Biograd

Post Number: 1180
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2010 - 7:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It sounds like a bunch of the palindromes from this page:

http://palindromes.hobby-site.org/

A lot of the ones on there are really funny, such as "Go hang a salami, I'm a lasagna hog!" Some of them would make good epitaphs too, at least for someone who believes that the end of their life is also the beginning!
Woodworm (Woodworm)
New member
Username: Woodworm

Post Number: 2363
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2010 - 5:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

... and of course epitaphs is an anagram of happiest.

(Thanks also for the reminder of the Welsh fowl-buttering puzzle, which was the first one I ever solved on the LTPF. Happy memories.)

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: