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Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 455
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Posted on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 9:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is a puzzle I read many years back. I couldn't find any evidence of it having been posted here, but if you recognize it, email first.

The percentage of Americans who speak Greek is rather small, only around 1% of the population according to the last census. But there are many American cities where police officers are required to learn Greek, sometimes even before popular languages such as Spanish or Chinese. Why?
Doriana (Doriana)
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Post Number: 513
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ancient Greek? Modern Greek?

Do they have to learn to read it? write it? speak it? understand spoken Greek?

Is it meant as some form of mental exercise?
Konnie (Konnie)
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Post Number: 58
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm going to email possible spoiler.
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 456
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Konnie's guess was correct

Ancient Greek? Modern Greek? This

Do they have to learn to read it? write it? speak it? This understand spoken Greek? Only what they learn to speak, no to the rest.

Is it meant as some form of mental exercise? Know
Doriana (Doriana)
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Post Number: 514
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 1:05 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are they supposed to use Greek as some kind of secret language? So that they can communicate confidential information without being overheard?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 457
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 1:35 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are they supposed to use Greek as some kind of secret language? Noish So that they can communicate confidential information without being overheard? No
Solo1 (Solo1)
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Post Number: 334
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 2:16 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do they simply have to know the alphabet in Greek? or counting in Greek?
Are they in a college town?
Konnie (Konnie)
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Post Number: 60
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 2:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sweet!
Sundowner (Sundowner)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 8:04 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is one particular word or phrase in Greek relevant?
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 10:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Using Greek letters when calling out Car registration numbers relevant?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 458
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Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:46 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do they simply have to know the alphabet in Greek? or counting in Greek?
Are they in a college town?

Is one particular word or phrase in Greek relevant?

Using Greek letters when calling out Car registration numbers relevant? No to all these
Biograd (Biograd)
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Post Number: 67
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Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 5:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This reminds me very much of another LTPF puzzle from way back--the language was different (I believe it was Romanian) but the puzzle statement was very similar.

Is the usefulness of Greek for this purpose the very fact that few Americans know how to speak it?

Do the police officers need to speak Greek to other people?
Gregoryuconn (Gregoryuconn)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 6:08 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Emailed
Balin (Balin)
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Post Number: 456
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Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 10:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And with Biograd's post I think I know it too. Pretty sure the language he refers to was Hungarian.
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 460
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Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 2:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the usefulness of Greek for this purpose the very fact that few Americans know how to speak it? Indeed...

Do the police officers need to speak Greek to other people? No, so yeah, you probably know it.
Enjay (Enjay)
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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 10:24 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do they speak it to other police officers?

Do they learn enough to be able to converse with a Greek person? Only certain words? Are they using Greek as some kind of code? Mnemonic? Is learning it a test of intelligence? A punishment?

Could they have learned some, say, Maltese for the same purpose?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 463
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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 2:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do they speak it to other police officers? Yope

Do they learn enough to be able to converse with a Greek person? No Only certain words? Yes Are they using Greek as some kind of code? Mnemonic? Is learning it a test of intelligence? A punishment? No to the rest

Could they have learned some, say, Maltese for the same purpose? Yes. It's often German or Hungarian instead.
Enjay (Enjay)
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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 4:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would they use the Greek words in a sentence otherwise consisting of English words? Do they use the Greek words to refer to the same things that they refer to in Greek? Do they learn nouns? Verbs? Adjectives?

If they happened to be working in a heavily Greek area of the city, would the Greek words still be useful? Could they make up nonsense words to serve the same purpose?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 464
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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 7:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would they use the Greek words in a sentence otherwise consisting of English words? No Do they use the Greek words to refer to the same things that they refer to in Greek? Yes Do they learn nouns? Verbs? Typically this Adjectives?

If they happened to be working in a heavily Greek area of the city, would the Greek words still be useful? Yope. They'd be less useful. Could they make up nonsense words to serve the same purpose? Yes
Sleepingbeaver (Sleepingbeaver)
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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 9:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do the police use the foreign words as a sort of disguise? Do they use them while on an undercover patrol? Do they want to trick criminals into believing they are foreigners and thus certainly not the police?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 11:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do the police use the foreign words as a sort of disguise? Do they use them while on an undercover patrol? Do they want to trick criminals into believing they are foreigners and thus certainly not the police? No to all
Enjay (Enjay)
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Post Number: 2907
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Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 9:55 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Might they use Greek when speaking face to face with another police officer? With a member of the public? When speaking over the telephone? Over radio? Do they use it to give commands? Make reports? Describe situations? Coordinate movements? Do they use Greek in the hearing of members of the public, assuming that they will not understand? Do they use it to pretend not to be English speakers?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 466
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Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 3:46 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Might they use Greek when speaking face to face with another police officer? Big yope With a member of the public? When speaking over the telephone? Over radio? Do they use it to give commands? Yes Make reports? Describe situations? Coordinate movements? Yes Do they use Greek in the hearing of members of the public, assuming that they will not understand? Yes Do they use it to pretend not to be English speakers?
The rest are no
Ixoye724 (Ixoye724)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 4:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are Greek words used to initial tactical maneuvers? Indicate a level of alertness? Alert fellow officers to certain conditions?

Is the use of Greek words done to confuse or misinform listeners? Is it to allow police to instruct each other openly without giving away their intentions to those who hear what they are saying?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 4:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are Greek words used to initial tactical maneuvers? Noish Indicate a level of alertness? No Alert fellow officers to certain conditions? No

Is the use of Greek words done to confuse or misinform listeners? No Is it to allow police to instruct each other openly without giving away their intentions to those who hear what they are saying? This is closest
Enjay (Enjay)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 8:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would they be in uniform when they use Greek? Do they use it when speaking to someone who they are not sure is a police officer? Is it like a password to check if the person they are speaking to is another officer? Do they use Greek words as codenames?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 8:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would they be in uniform when they use Greek? Yes Do they use it when speaking to someone who they are not sure is a police officer? Is it like a password to check if the person they are speaking to is another officer? Do they use Greek words as codenames? No to the rest
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would they tend to use Greek more often in a specific circumstance e.g when they've pulled over a driver? Sobriety tests relevant?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 4:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would they tend to use Greek more often in a specific circumstance e.g when they've pulled over a driver? Yes, DOYD of a "specific" circumstance Sobriety tests relevant? No
Sundowner (Sundowner)
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Posted on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 8:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do police officers use the Greek words when speaking to each other? with other people present?
Are they doing this in order to avoid the respective English word? so, that by-standers and people overhearing their conversation do not get immediately what is going on?
Is the police officer's intention: not to give away information? not to stir up emotions? not to start rumours?

I've heard of some airline staff referring to the case that someone died on the flight as "83" .. i.e. "we've got an 83 here" .. in order to avoid a panic among the other passengers. (8 and 3 standing for the eigth and third letter in the alphabet, HC, that is, human corpse.)

Are the police in this puzzle using Greek expressions for a similar purpose?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 3:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do police officers use the Greek words when speaking to each other? Big Yope with other people present? Yes
Are they doing this in order to avoid the respective English word? so, that by-standers and people overhearing their conversation do not get immediately what is going on? Yes
Is the police officer's intention: not to give away information? not to stir up emotions? not to start rumours? None of these

I've heard of some airline staff referring to the case that someone died on the flight as "83" .. i.e. "we've got an 83 here" .. in order to avoid a panic among the other passengers. (8 and 3 standing for the eigth and third letter in the alphabet, HC, that is, human corpse.)

Are the police in this puzzle using Greek expressions for a similar purpose? No
Enjay (Enjay)
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Posted on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 5:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do they use Greek when there is another police officer in hearing range? Do they use it when they don't want to be obviously speaking face to face with another officer?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Friday, February 14, 2014 - 1:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do they use Greek when there is another police officer in hearing range? Big Yope Do they use it when they don't want to be obviously speaking face to face with another officer? No
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 3:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HINT: There's reason I've been answering "Big Yope" to questions about whether the police officers use Greek when speaking to each other. It depends strongly on your interpretation of who- or what- counts as a police officer.
Kayleearafinwiel (Kayleearafinwiel)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 5:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

K-9 cops relevant? Do they give their commands to their dogs in Greek?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 6:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

K-9 cops relevant? Do they give their commands to their dogs in Greek?
That's definitely good enough for me.

******SPOILER******
It's common practice for police officers to use K-9 cops that respond only to foreign languages. Obviously, it prevents criminals from giving orders to the dogs that are being used against them. But it also allows them to give orders that others do not understand.

In addition, many police dogs are actually trained in Europe and exported to the US. It's considered easier to teach the new recruits in their "native language" than to switch to new commands. I used Greek as the example, but many police departments use Hungarian or German. (Germany, unsurprisingly, breeds a lot of German shepherds)

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