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Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Post Number: 167
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Posted on Friday, February 28, 2014 - 5:10 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If he had read it correctly, a certain word would either have a totally different meaning today or would not exist at all.
Balin (Balin)
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Posted on Friday, February 28, 2014 - 1:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this word in English? Another language?
Is the word in common use? Is it slang? Is it used mostly by members of a particular field?

"He" = H? A? M? A real historic figure?

Did he read "it" in a book? Magazine? On television? Online? Written by someone else?

By "read it", do you mean that he read the word? Or read something else?

Did he invent something relevant? Did he invent the word?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Post Number: 170
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Posted on Friday, February 28, 2014 - 7:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Balin (Balin)

Is this word in English? This Another language?
Is the word in common use? Fairly common. Certainly most Americans would know what it means. I don't know how common it is in other English speaking countries Is it slang? Not according to Merriam-Webster's online dictionary Is it used mostly by members of a particular field? No

"He" = H? A? M? A real historic figure? Yes to all

Did he read "it" in a book? Magazine? On television? Online? No to all

Written by someone else? Yes

By "read it", do you mean that he read the word? He read a word (incorrectly), but not THE word. Or read something else?

Did he invent something relevant? Yope (I don't think "invent" is quite the right word) Did he invent the word? Yope
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 570
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Posted on Friday, February 28, 2014 - 10:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the historical figure a literary figure? Is he primarily known for his written works? Since a godawful number of words were invented/shaped by Shakespeare: Is "he" Shakespeare?

Is the "certain word" similar to the word he read? Do they share a root word? Is the word he read the "certain words" root word? (ex. "nature" and "naturalization")
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Post Number: 173
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Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2014 - 1:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

Is the historical figure a literary figure? Yes Is he primarily known for his written works? Yes Since a godawful number of words were invented/shaped by Shakespeare: Is "he" Shakespeare? No

Is the "certain word" similar to the word he read? Do they share a root word? Is the word he read the "certain words" root word? (ex. "nature" and "naturalization") No to All
Gregoryuconn (Gregoryuconn)
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Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 3:46 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the word he read an English word? If not, is it a false cognate of the other word? A false friend?

False cognates are words in two different languages that mean similar things but are etymologically unrelated, like the word "dog" in an Australian Aboriginal language, which means dog. False friends, often incorrectly referred to as "false cognates" including on this very forum, are words in different languages which sound similar but have completely different meanings, like "embarrassed" and the Spanish "embarazada" which means pregnant.
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 6:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gregoryuconn (Gregoryuconn)

Is the word he read an English word? Yes If not, is it a false cognate of the other word? No A false friend? No

In reality, there are really three "words" involved. From this point on, we will call them "Word A", "Word B", and "Word C" where:

Word A = The actual word he read
Word B = The word he thought he read
Word C = "The word" (The one that would either have a different meaning today or would not exist)
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 2:17 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hint: This puzzle would be much easier if you first find out who is the literary figure.
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 580
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 5:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the literary figure from the Americas? From the British Isles? Was he known for writing novels? Poetry? Theatrical works?

Was he alive in the 1600's? The 1700's? The 1800's? The 1900's? Is he still alive today?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Post Number: 197
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 6:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

Is the literary figure from the Americas? From the British Isles? This

Was he known for writing novels? Poetry? Theatrical works? He has done all three, but is mostly known for novels

Was he alive in the 1600's? The 1700's? The 1800's? This The 1900's?

I think I can skip the last question
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 9:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is he British? If so, English? Scottish? Welsh? Is he Irish?

Lewis Carroll? Charles Dickens? Arthur Conan Doyle? Rudyard Kipling?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 9:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

Is he British? Yes If so, English? This Scottish? Welsh? Is he Irish?

Lewis Carroll? Charles Dickens? This Arthur Conan Doyle? Rudyard Kipling?

It's possible to find the answer at this point with google, but I don't recommend it. I think it would take the fun out of solving this one. Good luck
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 588
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 9:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Any of the following works relevant: Oliver Twist? Great Expectations? A Christmas Carol? A Tale of Two Cities?

Is there a famous scene from one of his works that's relevant? A famous character? A famous saying or line?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 9:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

Any of the following works relevant: Oliver Twist? Great Expectations? A Christmas Carol? This A Tale of Two Cities?

Is there a famous scene from one of his works that's relevant? A famous character? This A famous saying or line?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 591
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:03 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm assuming the relevant character is Scrooge? Is "scrooge" the word he created, as in "What a scrooge!"? Is Scrooge's name based on an existing English word? An existing person?

Alternatively, is the word "Humbug?"
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

I'm assuming the relevant character is Scrooge? Right! Well done!! Is "scrooge" the word he created, as in "What a scrooge!"? "Word C" (see above) is "scrooge" ... I don't think Dickens actually created the word. I think it became a word later, named for the character. Is Scrooge's name based on an existing English word? An existing person? This

Alternatively, is the word "Humbug?" No. See above

Now you have to figure out what words A and B are and where Dickens read A and thought it was B. Again, you could easily google this, but what fun is that?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Post Number: 595
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are either Word A or B the name of the person Scrooge was based on? Are they at all similar to the word "scrooge?"

Did he read Word A in a newspaper? A dictionary?
Balin (Balin)
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Post Number: 580
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Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 11:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah - now I know this one.
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 5:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

Are either Word A or B the name of the person Scrooge was based on? No. The person Scrooge was based on was named "Ebenezer Scroggie" Are they at all similar to the word "scrooge?" The definition of word B is slightly similar to, but not synonymous with that of the word "scrooge". The spelling of words A and B are not even close to the word "scrooge".

Did he read Word A in a newspaper? A dictionary?
Neither of these. (Remember, he didn't read it in a book or magazine.)
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 6:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did he perhaps read the word on a sign? A flyer? Some sort of advertisement? Was the "thing" he read primarily about Scroogie or his deeds?

So to clarify, did he misread Scroogie's name at all? Or did he just change it for legal reasons?

Is it relevant why he misread it? Was he very young? Relevant that he supposedly was mildly dyslexic? Did he read it from a great distance?

Does word B mean that someone was mean? Miserly? Grumpy? Uncaring?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 6:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

Just a small correction. You mean Scroggie. (with 2 G's). Not really relevant to the puzzle, but I will make the modifications

Did he perhaps read the word on a sign? Yope. (DOYD of "sign") A flyer? No Some sort of advertisement? No Was the "thing" he read primarily about Scroggie or his deeds? Yes

So to clarify, did he misread Scroggie's name at all? Or did he just change it for legal reasons? I'm not sure, but not really relevant to the puzzle

Is it relevant why he misread it? Not really Was he very young? No Relevant that he supposedly was mildly dyslexic? This is very likely partially responsible for the reason he misread it, but not relevant to the puzzle Did he read it from a great distance? No

Does word B mean that someone was mean? Yes. In fact word B is "Mean". You are getting very close Miserly? Grumpy? Uncaring?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 6:51 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So did Dickens think the yopish sign said that Scroggie was "mean," and it stuck? So he used the name? When really, the guy wasn't that mean?

So is Word A very close in spelling to "mean?" Does it have an extra letter? One less letter? Is one of the letters in "mean" another letter? If so, is it the "m"? "e"? "a"? "n"?

Was what he read written on paper? Something like paper? Wood? Stone? Did it have more than one page? Was it a complete sentence?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 7:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

So did Dickens think the yopish sign said that Scroggie was "mean," and it stuck? So he used the name? When really, the guy wasn't that mean? Yes to all

So is Word A very close in spelling to "mean?" Does it have an extra letter? One less letter? Is one of the letters in "mean" another letter? This If so, is it the "m"? "e"? "a"? "n"? This

Was what he read written on paper? Something like paper? Wood? Stone? This Did it have more than one page? No Was it a complete sentence? No. More like a phrase
Gregoryuconn (Gregoryuconn)
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Posted on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 4:27 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it his epitaph on his tombstone? Did it say "meager" when he thought it said "meaner"?
Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)
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Posted on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 2:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it written on a building, or some other structure?

So going through the alphabet, was the word he read actually:
Mead?
Meal?
Meat?
Paul1440 (Paul1440)
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Posted on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 6:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gregoryuconn (Gregoryuconn)

Was it his epitaph on his tombstone? Yes Did it say "meager" when he thought it said "meaner"? No

Alexanderhamilton (Alexanderhamilton)

So going through the alphabet, was the word he read actually:
Mead?
Meal? This
Meat?

We now have all the facts... We are now ready to post a.....

**************SPOILER**********************

The following is copied from the Wikipedia page for Ebenezer Scrooge...

In his diaries, Dickens states that Scrooge stems from a grave marker which he saw in 1841, while taking an evening walk in the Canongate Kirkyard in Edinburgh. The headstone was for the vintner Ebenezer Lennox Scroggie, a relative of Adam Smith, who had won the catering contract for the visit of George IV to Edinburgh and the first contract to supply whisky to the Royal Navy. The grave marker identified Scroggie as a "meal man" (corn merchant, (corn can be used to make whisky)), but Dickens misread this as "mean man", due to the fading light and his mild dyslexia. Dickens wrote that it must have "shrivelled" Scroggie’s soul to carry "such a terrible thing to eternity". The grave marker was lost during construction work at part of the kirkyard in 1932.

So, if Dickens had read the word "meal" correctly, the word "scrooge" would either have a different meaning today or not exist at all

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