[rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

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[rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Fri Sep 23, 2016 6:36 am

In a certain part of the world, people commonly greet each other in a way considered strange even by some close relatives. In another part of the world, an analogous greeting is widely used and never raises eyebrows.

Two other puzzles are sinking slowly but surely at the bottom of the page. Recaps to these will be posted shortly, in the hope that they will spark renewed interest.
Last edited by rcb on Thu Sep 29, 2016 6:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Twilightseeker » Fri Sep 23, 2016 11:27 am

First part of the world: in Europe? The Americas? Asia? Australia? Oceania? Africa? Elsewhere?

Would I (a female US citizen of European origin) find this to be a "strange" greeting practice, possibly?

Does the greeting involve words? In a certain language? is the language involve (if indeed it is) metaphorical? Any gesture involved? The other part of the world, is it very far away from the first mentioned part of the world?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby jumpingjacks » Fri Sep 23, 2016 11:46 am

Do the close relatives find it strange when the greeting is done to them? Or when they see their relative greet someone else in that manner?
"Strange" - because they find it overly intimate? not intimate enough? overly formal? overly casual? awkward?

Is the analogous greeting exactly the same as the first greeting?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Fri Sep 23, 2016 12:30 pm

First part of the world: in Europe? This one The Americas? Asia? Australia? Oceania? Africa? Elsewhere?

Would I (a female US citizen of European origin) find this to be a "strange" greeting practice, possibly? Highly unlikely, unless your European origins are in some part of Europe where it might be considered "strange".

Does the greeting involve words? Yes In a certain language? Yes is the language involve (if indeed it is) metaphorical? No Any gesture involved? No The other part of the world, is it very far away from the first mentioned part of the world? DOYD, but it is also in Europe.

Do the close relatives find it strange when the greeting is done to them? Or when they see their relative greet someone else in that manner? Both.
"Strange" - because they find it overly intimate? not intimate enough? overly formal? overly casual? awkward? The last one is closest. None of the rest.

Is the analogous greeting exactly the same as the first greeting? No, but it shares some commonality.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby jumpingjacks » Fri Sep 23, 2016 2:13 pm

First part of the world - is it the UK? There seem to have been lots of Brit puzzles lately.
Is the language English? Is the greeting a question? An exclamation? Does the greeter expect the greetee to reply?

Is it, "You alright?" (I actually hate that greeting...)
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Twilightseeker » Sat Sep 24, 2016 6:47 am

The language: is it Italian by any chance? English? French? Is it a Germanic language? Slavic? Romance? Other?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Mon Sep 26, 2016 7:38 am

First part of the world - is it the UK? No There seem to have been lots of Brit puzzles lately. Not in this case
Is the language English? No. I avoid puzzles involving English language features, with so many natives around :) Is the greeting a question? No An exclamation? No Does the greeter expect the greetee to reply? Usually, yes

Is it, "You alright?" (I actually hate that greeting...) No

The language: is it Italian by any chance? One of them is, yes English? French? Is it a Germanic language? Slavic? Romance? Yes Other? No to the rest
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:20 am

Is Italy the part of the world with "strange" greeting? Is the other Romania?
Is it a one word greet?
Is it related to a part of the day (like "buongiorno" or "buonasera")? Is it the informal "ciao"?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:04 am

Is Italy the part of the world with "strange" greeting? No Is the other Romania? No The other way around.
Is it a one word greet? Yes
Is it related to a part of the day (like "buongiorno" or "buonasera")? No Is it the informal "ciao"? Yes!
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Mon Sep 26, 2016 12:08 pm

So we need the equivalent of "ciao" in Romanian (which I suppose it's not "salut"...the only one I know from Dragostea Din Tei)?
Is the greet used when two peopele meet? or when they part?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby jumpingjacks » Mon Sep 26, 2016 12:20 pm

Do Romanians also say "ciao"?
In Romania, are the people using the greeting and the people who find it strange the same people? Or is it the case that it is a common greeting among a subset of the population, and another subset considers it strange? Older generation vs younger generation perhaps?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:37 pm

So we need the equivalent of "ciao" in Romanian One such equivalent is relevant (which I suppose it's not "salut" This is the generic equivalent, not relevant here... the only one I know from Dragostea Din Tei)?
Is the greet used when two peopele meet? This one or when they part? No

Do Romanians also say "ciao"? No, or not relevantly
In Romania, are the people using the greeting and the people who find it strange the same people? No Or is it the case that it is a common greeting among a subset of the population, and another subset considers it strange?This one Older generation vs younger generation perhaps? No
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:24 pm

Are the two substes distinguished by: age? religion? etnicity? job? political ideal?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Mon Sep 26, 2016 4:15 pm

Are the two substes distinguished by: age? religion? etnicity? job? political ideal? None of these
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby CoffeeBean » Mon Sep 26, 2016 7:19 pm

Are homophones relevant? Two different things with very similar if not identical sounding names?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:23 am

Are homophones relevant? Two different things with very similar if not identical sounding names? No to both, but you're right in exploring a different analogy between the two greetings - apart from the fact that they are both greetings.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Tue Sep 27, 2016 3:18 pm

Etymology relevant? (I know "ciao" comes form "schiavo"=slave)
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Tue Sep 27, 2016 7:04 pm

Etymology relevant? (I know "ciao" comes form "schiavo"=slave) Exactly and precisely so! Only one thing left and we can $poyle it.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby CoffeeBean » Tue Sep 27, 2016 7:07 pm

"Ciao" also sounds like part of Nicolae Ceaușescu, but I don't think that's relevant in this case...
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Tue Sep 27, 2016 7:25 pm

So...the Romanian greet also comes from the (latin, I guess) word "slave"?
And...we still have to figure out what the two subsets are, right?
Are they distinguished by geography (as in, they live in separate parts of the country)?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:33 am

"Ciao" also sounds like part of Nicolae Ceaușescu, but I don't think that's relevant in this case... Sounds a little bit like that, but irrelevant

So...the Romanian greet also comes from the (latin, I guess) word "slave"? Yope to Yes-ish! Explore this a bit.
And...we still have to figure out what the two subsets are, right? See below
Are they distinguished by geography (as in, they live in separate parts of the country)? Yes, this is the difference. Nothing further here.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Wed Sep 28, 2016 11:50 am

Does the Romanian greet come from a latin word? if yes, is the latin word a synonimous of "slave"? or with a similar meaning?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Wed Sep 28, 2016 1:51 pm

Does the Romanian greet come from a latin word? Yope. Does not come from, but... if yes, is the latin word a synonimous of "slave"? Yes or with a similar meaning? No
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby Acridian9 » Wed Sep 28, 2016 5:57 pm

Do you mean it is exactely a latin word?
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby rcb » Thu Sep 29, 2016 6:44 am

Do you mean it is exactely a latin word? Yes

******* SPOILER *******

In a certain part of Romania, the customary greeting ("Hello!") is "Servus!", a Latin word (apparently derived from the phrase Servus humillimus, Domine spectabilis! - "Your humble servant, my noble Lord!", a derivation of which most if not all of the users are ignorant) meaning "slave". In other parts of the country, this style of greeting is considered strange, understood but never used, but helps indicate the region the speaker is coming from.

The greeting is not unique to Romania, in one form or another it exists in many Central European countries, but I don't know how frequent it is in there.

I found interesting that a similar greeting in Italy is widespread and never raises eyebrows. ("Ciao" apparently comes from a Venetian rendition of "Your slave").

I was slavishly inspired by Stephen's puzzle about "mille grazie" opposite "thanks a million".

Merci mille fois to all who participated and to Acridian9 for sticking with it to the end and delivering the final blow.

Servus!
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle (SOLVED)

Postby GalFisk » Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:22 am

Good one.
In Swedish, one of our most informal greetings is "tjenare", "tjena" or "tja", all from "tjänare" (servant). In formality it may rank with the English "yo" or "sup". It is mostly used as a positive/happy greeting.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle (SOLVED)

Postby CoffeeBean » Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:20 pm

Very informative puzzle. Regional dialect and word usage/intent is abundant. In parts of the United States, especially in the upper midwest, it is very common and not considered rude to simply say "Yep!" instead of "you're welcome" and it's also substituted for "Hello?" sometimes when answering the phone. In the southern US (Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama) this is more commonly a substitute for "Yes." I had become used to the midwestern use of the word since I had some clients there who would commonly say "Yep?" when answering the phone or reply "Yep!" when I thanked them for something. Recently I was having a discussion with someone who lives in a part of the US where this word isn't used often for any reason. As we were discussing word usage, he asked me, 'Haven't you ever noticed how people in the midwest say 'Yep!' all the time? Like instead of 'hello' or when you thank them for something? And they don't think it's rude up there, it's just how everybody talks." Up until that point I'd never thought about it.
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Re: [rcb] Slavishly inspired by an ongoing puzzle

Postby irishelk » Mon Oct 31, 2016 1:32 am

I found a similar regionalism (or maybe it's a family-specific thing?) with one of my friends: if he had no preference for something, he'd say "I don't mind," while everyone else I know would say "I don't care"--to me, "I don't mind" means "You did something that could be considered annoying, but it's not annoying to me." I wondered several times what exactly I'd done, before catching on.
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